New Publication: Mental Health Uncertainty and Inevitability – Rejuvenating the Relationship between Social Science and Psychiatry

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We are delighted to announce the publication of a new book titled Mental Health Uncertainty and Inevitability: Rejuvenating the Relationship between Social Science and Psychiatry, edited by Dr Hugh Middleton and Dr Melanie Jordan. The book celebrates the interdisciplinary doctoral work and supervision of scholars from the School of Sociology and Social Policy, School of Health Sciences and Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham. The book offers original knowledge, debate and understanding from frontline fieldwork data and the relations between mental health difficulties, mental healthcare provision and social theory. Over nine chapters, key questions and discussions examine:

  • A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Mental Health Assertive Outreach – Dr James Roe
  • The Role of Everyday Interaction Rituals Within Therapeutic Communities – Dr Jenelle Clarke
  • The Dementia Experience: Sociological Observations on the Construction of Cognition in Care Homes – Dr Kezia Scales
  • “The Will’s There and the Skill’s There”: Prison Mental Healthcare – Dr Melanie Jordan
  • Institutional and Emotion Work in Forensic Psychiatry: Detachment and Desensitisation – Dr Ada Hui
  • Community Mental Health Teams: Interacting Groups of Citizen-Agent? – Dr Hugh Middleton
  • Handling Role Boundaries: A Basic Social Process Underpinning Decision-Making in Mental Health Teams – Dr Melanie Narayanasamy

Andrew Grundy, current PhD candidate in the School of Health Sciences, in the foreword to the book, wrote: “I commend this book to the field of mental health and illness and encourage scholars, clinicians, service users, and carers to read and consider its contents. It represents a timely, apt and worthy contribution to both psychiatry and social science. This book will obviously be of benefit to anyone interested in social theory as it presents novel applications of existing sociological theories; it will also help clinicians to step back and consider the social context in which they are working and the impacts that it can have on their practice. But it is my hope that this book will also be of benefit to mental health service users (and their carers) as they consider their social identity and what they want to get out of the services that they choose to use.”

Praise for the book has come from renowned leaders and scholars within this field. Brigitte Nerlich, Professor of Science, Language and Society, University of Nottingham writes: It is refreshing to see contributions by young and emerging social science writers grappling with cutting edge issues that transgress disciplines and academic cultures. Their findings should make academic and non-academic readers alike think afresh about mental health as an issue not only of medicine and medication but of culture and socialisation. Most importantly, the book makes us all think about whether it is possible or desirable to take refuge in biomedical certainty alone when dealing with mental health issues.”

Anne Rogers, Professor of Health Systems Implementation, University of Southampton, Author of A Sociology of Mental Health and Illness states: “Scholarly work undertaken by up and coming social scientists working in the area of social science applied to mental health.  The novelty of these interesting contributions lies in the concern to link social science theory, concepts and methods to the various settings and places within which mental health is managed thought about and enacted.   This collection which provides excellent insights into contemporary mental health matters demonstrates the opportunities and possibilities  that  mental health service settings can provide for  conducting  exciting social science research.”

Michael West, Senior Fellow, The King’s Fund and Professor of Organizational Psychology, Lancaster University:  “This collection offers powerful insights into the ways in which social science research can help us understand how to develop mental health services to ensure high quality, continually improving and compassionate care. It reveals also the rich field of opportunities for research that the study of mental health services offers for researchers. The contributors are all practitioners with social science research training and their commitment, wisdom and compassion shine through the content.”

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A panel discussion will be held to mark the launch of this book on 30th June 2017, 1-3pm, C11, Portland Building, University Park: https://mentalhealthuncertaintyandinevitability.eventbrite.co.uk

Further information about the book can be found on the publisher’s website: https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319439693

This post was prepared by Dr Ada Hui, Assistant Professor at the School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham. Ada has particular interests working with disenfranchised communities.  Her research focuses on emotional labour, organisational culture and social suffering.

Email: ada.hui@nottingham.ac.uk                                                                                       Twitter: @adahui1

 

 

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